Music

Chair: Mark Pullinger pullingercc@btinternet.com
Hon Secretary: Amanda Holloway Amanda@mandah.net

The aims of the Music Section of the Critics’ Circle are: a) to promote the art of criticism and to uphold its integrity in practice; b) to foster and safeguard the professional interests of its members and to provide opportunities for social intercourse among them; and c) to support the advancement of the arts. Though the Circle is decidedly not a trade union, it tries to encourage best practice.

We meet to discuss and decide bread and butter matters three times a year. Occasionally we host meetings with a leading figure from the music world. We also hold luncheons or dinners to celebrate the lifetime achievement of some very special artist, writer, composer or instrumentalist. The music section has about 80 members. At present, it consists overwhelmingly of classical music and opera critics, though we welcome critics of other kinds of music (jazz, pop, and world music).

News & Reviews

Marnie, English National Opera

Take two by Jessica Duchen Nico Muhly’s opera is a gigantic achievement in every sense. A sprawling, complex, fascinating story feeds Nicholas Wright’s fine libretto with unusually well-rounded characters – and Muhly meets them with a score that glimmers and glows in...

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Under starter’s orders

On Wednesday 6 December 2017, the winner of the Critics' Circle's annual award for Distinguished Service to the Arts will be announced at the Circle's Annual General Meeting in London, and in due course published. The 500 members of the Circle are currently deciding...

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Marnie, English National Opera

Hitch free by Paul Levy Unlike most of my colleagues, I liked, and was even a little moved by the world première of Nico Muhly’s Marnie by the English National Opera (it goes to the NY Metropolitan next year). I particularly relished Nicholas...

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Semiramide, Royal Opera

Baal canto by Tom Sutcliffe Semiramide, written for Venice in 1823, was Rossini’s last Italian opera seria, before he spread his wings with trips to Vienna, London and above all Paris – though he never profitably adapted this particular Voltaire-based tragedy to the...

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